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adjuvants
Vaccines have several components. Antigens stimulate antibodies in the immune system to combat infectious diseases. Adjuvants are substances added to vaccines that enhance the ability of antigens to stimulate the body's immune response. Adjuvant

comes from the
Latin word adiuvare,
meaning


to help.
Preclinical studies have shown that our adjuvant technology, in concert with key malaria antigens, provides a broad level of protection against multiple malaria strains.


quick facts

Although malaria has been eradicated in North America and Europe, there are 250 million new cases of malaria each year in developing countries. Increased resistance to standard drugs and insecticides exacerbates the threat of this disease. Children under 5 bear the greatest burden of this preventable disease.
Our Focus

IDRI is a leading innovator of adjuvants that stimulate the immune system. We have built a portfolio of proprietary adjuvants and are using our adjuvant technologies to empower the immune system to recognize and destroy malaria parasites. This should facilitate the development of a malaria vaccine. Data suggest that adjuvants will be an essential part of a successful malaria vaccine, and our adjuvants have been proven in preclinical models of malaria.

We are working with the U.S. government as well as manufacturers in endemic countries to begin making the required adjuvants for next generation vaccines. Sites in Brazil and India are targeted for technology transfer where our scientists will train their engineers and scientists to produce those formulations necessary for effective malaria vaccine products. more

Making a Difference

Preclinical studies have shown that our adjuvant technology, in concert with key malaria antigens, provide a broad level of protection against multiple malaria strains.

About Malaria

Description: Sample College Image Although malaria has been eradicated in North America and Europe, there are 250 million new cases of malaria each year in developing countries. Increased resistance to standard drugs and insecticides exacerbates the threat of this disease. Children under 5 bear the greatest burden of this preventable disease.

Following the infective bite of an Anopheles mosquito, there is an incubation period of between 7-30 days before the first symptoms appear. Such long delays between exposure and development of symptoms can often lead to incorrect or delayed diagnosis by the healthcare provider. Infection with malaria parasites may result in a wide variety of symptoms, ranging from absent or very mild symptoms to severe disease and death. The accumulation of parasitic wastes and toxins in the blood stream gives rise to the symptoms associated with malaria.

What is Needed to Stop Malaria?

Malaria is preventable and curable. For decades, preventive medications such as quinine have been available to travelers visiting countries where malaria infection is prevalent. However, the cost, combined with malaria's growing drug resistance, makes drug regimens for the world's poorest and most at-risk impractical. Other current preventive techniques include insecticides and mosquito netting, although these also have significant limitations. Development of a vaccine that would protect those living in malaria-prone regions would greatly decrease sickness and death in these areas and may be the only way to make a large impact on the disease in some countries.


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Infectious Disease Research Institute